From Poor to Rich: Michael Moore, Cornel West & Tavis Smiley on Personal Finance (2012)

From Poor to Rich: Michael Moore, Cornel West & Tavis Smiley on Personal Finance (2012) Michael Francis Moore (born April 23, 1954) is an American filmmaker, author, journalist and liberal political activist.[2] He is the director and producer of Fahrenheit 9/11 (2004), a critical look at the presidency of George W. Bush and the War on Terror, which is the highest-grossing documentary of all time and winner of the Palme d’Or.[3] His films Bowling for Columbine (2002), which examines the causes for the Columbine High School massacre and Sicko (2007), which examines health care in the United States, focusing on its health insurance and the pharmaceutical industry, also placed in the top ten highest-grossing documentaries,[3] and the former won the Academy Award for Documentary Feature. In September 2008, he released his first free movie on the Internet, Slacker Uprising, which documented his personal quest to encourage more Americans to vote in presidential elections.[4] He has also written and starred in the TV shows TV Nation, a satirical newsmagazine television series and The Awful Truth, a satirical show. Susan Lynn Suze Orman (born June 5, 1951) is an American author, financial advisor, motivational speaker, and television host. Orman was born in Chicago and received her B.A. in social work. She worked as a financial advisor for Merrill Lynch. In 1983 she became the vice-president of investments at Prudential Bache Securities and in 1987 founded the Suze Orman Financial Group. Her program The Suze Orman Show began airing on CNBC in 2002. In 2006 she won a Gracie Award for Outstanding Program Host on the The Suze Orman Show on CNBC. She has written several books on the topic of personal finance. In 1987, Orman resigned from Prudential and founded the Suze Orman Financial Group, in Emeryville, California. She was director of the firm until 1997.[15] Orman published three books between 1997 and 1999: The 9 Steps to Financial Freedom (1997), You Earned it Don’t Lose it (1999), and The Courage to be Rich (1999). Other books by Orman include: The Road to Wealth (2001) and The Laws of Money, The Lessons of Life (2003). The Suze Orman Show began airing on CNBC in 2002. In February 2008, Orman gave away copies of her book Women and Money for free following an appearance on The Oprah Winfrey Show, generating almost two million downloads. Orman has been featured on the Food Network’s Paula’s Party. In January 2011, Orman appeared on the TV show, Oprah’s Allstars. In January 2012, Orman’s six-episode TV series America’s Money Class with Suze Orman premiered on OWN: Oprah Winfrey Network. Tavis Smiley (/ˈtævɨs/; born September 13, 1964) is an American talk show host, author, liberal political commentator, entrepreneur, advocate and philanthropist.[1][2] Smiley was born in Gulfport, Mississippi, and grew up in Bunker Hill, Indiana. After attending Indiana University, he worked during the late 1980s as an aide to Tom Bradley, the mayor of Los Angeles. Smiley became a radio commentator in 1991, and starting in 1996, he hosted the talk show BET Talk (later renamed BET Tonight) on BET. After Smiley sold an exclusive interview of Sara Jane Olson to ABC News in 2001, BET declined to renew Smiley’s contract that year. Smiley then began hosting The Tavis Smiley Show on NPR (2002-04) and currently hosts Tavis Smiley on PBS on the weekdays and The Tavis Smiley Show from PRI. From 2010 to 2013, Smiley and Cornel West joined forces to host their own radio talk show, Smiley & West. They were featured together interviewing musician Bill Withers in the 2009 documentary film Still Bill.[3] He is the new host of Tavis Talks on BlogTalkRadio’s Tavis Smiley Network. Cornel Ronald West (born June 2, 1953) is an American philosopher, academic, activist, author, public intellectual, and prominent member of the Democratic Socialists of America. The son of a Baptist minister, West received his undergraduate education at Harvard University, graduating with a bachelor’s degree in 1973, and received a Ph.D at Princeton University in 1980, becoming the first African American to graduate from Princeton with a Ph.D in philosophy.[1] He was formerly The Class of 1943 Professor of African American Studies at Princeton[2][3] before leaving the school in 2011 to become Professor of Philosophy and Christian Practice at the Union Theological Seminary[4] in New York City. He previously taught at Harvard before leaving the school after a highly publicized dispute with then-president Lawrence Summers, and has also spent time teaching at the University of Paris.